Hsing Yi Qi Gong
& Nei Gong Energies

  • METAL-LUNGS
    Pi Quan is like an axe,
    rising and falling; it hits downward and forward;
    transferring power diagonally in an elastic inverted J-pattern.
    Metal is a heat generator.

  • WATER-KIDNEYS
    Zuan Quan, is like a bubbling spring, or lightning.
    Rising, drilling, falling, overturning; yin & yang turning.
    Emphasize the return to emptiness, between moves.
    This washes the marrow.
    Horizontal waist circles in a Horse Stance, with palms of the hands over the lower back, and thumbs pointed down; strengthens the kidneys.

  • WOOD-LIVER
    Ben Quan, is released like an arrow,
    and hits with a crushing fist.
    The two fists attack, in a rotating cycling fashion, blocking hand first.
    Front hand pull energy ,continues with rear reverse punch in a horizontal J-pattern.
    Similar to the Tai Chi move 'Brush Knee'.

  • FIRE-HEART
    Pao Quan is like a cannon
    with diagonal movements, it evades.
    Fire travels up and sidewise. It is very hot; sometimes heating the room.
    Make sure to use the lower energy and watch for the upper body's tendency to become overly Yang (top heavy, flushed, and shallow breath).

  • EARTH-SPLEEN
    Heng Quan is like a ball, with circle energy,
    internal movement, like tearing cotton cloth.
    Earth is the best for feeling and cultivating this 'tearing cotton' energy.
    It is eager to be closed and curved.

Learning From Animals

Do not think like an animal;
Think like an animal thinks.

Spatial thinking incorporates views from many angles and is not limited by right/wrong dualistic and mutually thinking. Dualistic thinking tends to see one side as completely wrong or right; without being able to take advantage of the strengths and weaknesses of each view. At times: these discrepancies in dualistic seeing point to something much larger at work.

We can learn more by studying what we have in common with animals, than how we are different.

Humans learned to hunt in packs, from wolves, and is detailed in the book; Animals in Translation, by Dr. Temple Grandin.

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